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Questions about Arctic Fox Campers


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#1 Bob52

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 08:36 PM

Now thinking about buying a 5th wheel Arctic Fox and wondering if this is a good choice for a winter camper? Someone told me the 5th wheel is really heavy compared to a regular 5th wheel. Need a 3/4 or 1 ton truck to pull it?



Looking at the models for slide in camper 811 and 990 and the 5th wheel.



Thanks, Bob

Edited by Bob52, 27 October 2012 - 08:52 PM.


#2 saltfevr

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 11:33 PM

Bob:

Try the Arctic Fox/Nash owners Forum: http://www/afnash.com Good Luck !
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#3 Leadfoot

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 01:15 AM

Bob:

Try the Arctic Fox/Nash owners Forum: http://www/afnash.com Good Luck !


Change the forward slash to a dot after "www" - and it works better - http://www.afnash.com - Northwood (Nash) owners forums.


Try the 5th wheel forum on RV.Net. Specifically for 5th wheel owners. Post - ask questions - and, use the search feature.

Just for fun - I tried a search (only in the 5th wheel forum) on Arctic Fox = 190 matches. - Northwood = 102 matches. - Didn't try - "Nash".
(I'm sure if you went to the "archives" there - -threads over 1 year old- - you would find lots more)

Some of those will have info you're interested in - some not. You're the "filter".

.
.

Edited by Leadfoot, 28 October 2012 - 01:25 AM.


#4 Kirk

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 06:46 AM

Arctic Fox spec sheet

Any RV that you find which is built to withstand very cold weather will also be heavy. It simply is not possible to build a very lite weight RV which is well insulated because of the weight of the materials needed that do not conduct heat. The most light weight material for RV frames which has strength is aluminum but it is also a very good conductor of heat. Our motorhome was one which was well insulated but the structural framework of the walls was of aluminum with spaces filled with foam insulating material. In very cold weather you could easily see the pattern of the aluminum frame on the outside of the RV by looking for the lines pattern made by moisture condensation. When there was a heavy due the sides would be wet or frosted with lines that remained dry where each frame member was located, due to the heat transmitted through the wall. That is pretty typical of most RVs which are not designed for extreme cold. ;)

Edited by Kirk, 28 October 2012 - 06:54 AM.

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#5 Bob52

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 09:12 AM

Arctic Fox spec sheet

Any RV that you find which is built to withstand very cold weather will also be heavy. It simply is not possible to build a very lite weight RV which is well insulated because of the weight of the materials needed that do not conduct heat. The most light weight material for RV frames which has strength is aluminum but it is also a very good conductor of heat. Our motorhome was one which was well insulated but the structural framework of the walls was of aluminum with spaces filled with foam insulating material. In very cold weather you could easily see the pattern of the aluminum frame on the outside of the RV by looking for the lines pattern made by moisture condensation. When there was a heavy due the sides would be wet or frosted with lines that remained dry where each frame member was located, due to the heat transmitted through the wall. That is pretty typical of most RVs which are not designed for extreme cold. ;)


Thanks for the information and 5th wheels and others are built execllent. I will be getting one of them for sure. I'm looking at a 2003 model and hope it's built the same.


Thanks, Bob



#6 Bob52

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 07:17 PM

Been to see the 2003 which is a 2004 pick-up camper and it looks in real good shape. The person that owns it is a handyman and you can see he has added at few things to it. He wants $9500.00 firm. There is no doubt that it will need a 3/4 ton HD truck with air bags on the real springs.

The 2001 pick-up camper will need a one ton or greater because the model is 11.5 ft which fits an 8 ft truck bed -- 19ft. overall length. It weighs 3,235 lbs empty and will need a stout truck to haul it.


Tomorrow I will go see the 5th wheel trailer.




Thanks, Bob




#7 Earl

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 10:36 PM

Shoot, I just typed a great response but my computer did a weird thing and it all disappeared. To make it short, I love our AF 32.5 fiver. You do need at least a 3/4 ton diesel to pull it but I never felt the need for more. It was very stable and I never felt out of control. Great rig,no problems, built like a tank. No condensation issues, no drafts, even heating and cooling--what else can I say? Email me if you want more info.

2007 Arctic Fox 32.5rds for full-timing, now sold.

2011 23rks Keystone Hideout for the local campgrounds now that we are off the road
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#8 Bob52

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 03:14 AM

I'm wondering if there is a big demand for pick-up truck campers anymore? Does people want more Travel Trailers over 5th wheels and truck campers?

#9 Alaska Pokernut

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 06:42 AM

Good topic and good questions. There are alot of Arctic Fox campers up here but mostly single dudes pulling a snowmachine or 4 wheeler trailer. They are heavy so yes on the 3/4 or 1 ton.

I think that people mostly trend towards the TT is because familys take alot of space, they only use it for weekend every month or so and there alot cheaper. With that said, 5th wheels are more expensive and are not real family friendly. Most are designed toward the couples idea and long stays I think.

Ok enough of my rambling...but... Arctic Fox and others do have some serious truck campers nowdays with slide out and everything. If you want to really get out in the boonies thats the one. But for me I will keep the 5ver.

good day

#10 Earl

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 10:10 PM

I think truck campers have always been for the great outdoors people who want to get out in the boonies to hunt, fish, pull a snow mobile or four wheelies. They are bought mostly by younger guys or couples. AF started life with their campers and built them to go anywhere, anytime. But for long-term living they are a pain to climb up into and out of, small and cramped. When I was in my 30's I had one and the family loved it. Kids rode in the upper bed with the dog (no such a thing as club cab back then). But in the winter it would have been the pits for more than a day or two.

If you want to live in something for the winter get a fiver, MH or trailer.

2007 Arctic Fox 32.5rds for full-timing, now sold.

2011 23rks Keystone Hideout for the local campgrounds now that we are off the road
2007 Silverado 2500 diesel

Loving Green Valley, AZ (just South of Tucson)
 


#11 RLAWyo

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 07:58 PM

I have seen many construction workers spend Wyoming winters in an Arctic Fox. We have camped down to zero with no problems. Short period of time though.
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#12 Bob52

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 05:20 AM

I'm looking more at a 5th wheel Arctic Fox trailer now and maybe a 5th wheel with camper trailer with storage for toys. Wonder if I can take my boxes from a 6x14 cargo double axle trailer and load it on my 5th wheel camper? I have about 10 plastic boxes. Instead of toys I use the space for these boxes and so I can sell the Cargo trailer.

Thanks, Bob

Edited by Bob52, 31 October 2012 - 05:21 AM.


#13 DavidMc

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 08:38 AM

Bob,

You have probably already noticed that the Northwood Mfg. 5-th wheel in toy-hauler format is called a "Desert Fox".

#14 Bob52

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 11:22 AM


2013 Desert Fox: 24AS Sport Utility RV


http://www.northwood...=desert&id=1024

#15 Kirk

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 04:22 PM

It looks pretty good to me. Should make a good choice.

Good travelin !...............Kirk

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#16 Bob52

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 10:58 PM

Found out today from a dealer that the Truck camper's are real top heavy and that's why they don't sell the this camper anymore they said..

Edited by Bob52, 04 November 2012 - 05:53 PM.


#17 LindaH

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 08:54 AM

Found out today from a dealer that Truck camper's are real top heavy and that's on thing way they don't sell the anymore they said..

Yes, they are. However, with the correct truck, that's usually not a problem unless you plan on doing rock crawling. For most campers that extend over the rear of the truck, I wouldn't carry it on anything less than a 1-ton with DRWs. We've had three large truck campers in our RVing life and never had a problem with them because of height.

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#18 Rich&Sylvia

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 08:54 AM

If a 990, then you'll certainly want a one-ton truck, preferably a dually.
We currently have an AF 1140 and it is built HEAVY and really need a medium duty truck. Our F350 dually just doesn't cut it anymore.
You'll also want to get dual pane windows. The single pane steam up very easily.
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#19 Atchafalaya_man

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 11:36 AM

"Found out today from a dealer that Truck camper's are real top heavy and that's on thing way they don't sell the anymore they said.."AND THEN THE SALESMAN SAID, "So let me show you this 40 foot Fifth-Wheeler we have for sale."



#20 Bob52

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 06:06 PM

Your right the dealer tried selling me a 5th wheeler for 25,000 which I don't want a new one. The dealer has a used Arctic Fox truck camper but he wanted me to buy a new 5th wheel. I decided to buy from a home owner instead of a dealer anyway because I want to get around sales taxes and hidden costs. I'm still looking at the one below and wondering if that is good deal?

http://www.golsn.com...rs/3075645.html