Jump to content


Photo

Looking for advice on building a campground in NH


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
51 replies to this topic

#1 ZEPPY

ZEPPY

    New Member

  • All Members
  • 4 posts

Posted 13 August 2012 - 08:57 PM

Hello everybody, I found this site recently and it seems to be the place to go for answers. I am looking for some advice/tips/suggestions for developing a campground in NH. I have a property in mind and I have been working on a design and construction costs. I am mostly looking for design criteria because I do not own nor have I ever used an RV. I have a lot more information to share but I will wait to see if there is any interest in this topic.

Thank you,
Zeppy

#2 AFChap

AFChap

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 3394 posts
  • SKP#:83500

Posted 13 August 2012 - 09:10 PM

It can be frustrating and/or amusing for rv'ers to stay in an rv park designed/built by someone who knows perhaps a little ...but obviously not a lot ...about rv's. What works best for tt's or fifth wheels can be marginally workable for motorhomes,(placement of utilities, patio, etc) and vice versa. Building the best compromise that works ok for all can be a challemge.
Paul (KE5LXU), former fulltimer, now sometimer...
'03 Winnebago Ultimate Advantage 40E
'05 Honda Odyssey
Escapees, FMCA, WIT, SMART
http://www.pjrider.com

#3 PETE & PAT

PETE & PAT

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1177 posts

Posted 13 August 2012 - 09:42 PM

RV/Big Rig friendly does not mean it needs to look like a parking lot with everyone crammed in together. Sites with some type of privacy seperation and of good size is most desired. We avoid parks where all trees have been stripped out and there is a "parking lot" with utilities.

Pat DeJong


#4 Rif

Rif

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 4715 posts
  • SKP#:84860

Posted 13 August 2012 - 09:43 PM

The first thing you need to figure out is if your are going to develop a campground or an RV park. In New England those two are not the same thing. Do you intend to appeal to the tent/family crowd or to the RV'ing crowd? Are you looking to be a place for people to stay on their way through, or a destination spot where people go to spend their vacation? Knowing what you have in mind would help us give you suggestions.
2000 Volvo 770, 500HP/1650FP Cummins N14 and 10 Speed Autoshift 3.58 Rear 202" WB, 2002 Teton Aspen Royal 43 Foot, Burgman 650 Scooter

#5 Barbaraok

Barbaraok

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 7685 posts
  • SKP#:90761

Posted 13 August 2012 - 10:15 PM

20x50 sites minimum. Level front to back, slight tilt to side for drainage ok. Utilities in the middle. Open sky to the southwest for satellites. Full hookup with 50 amp power. Roads wide enough to allow ease in getting into and out of sites. If you are going to offer cable and WiFi, make sure it is decent and works. Walking area for pets and also for adults.
These are some back of the napkin types of things you should think about. But the best thing you can do is rent an RV and go RVing.
Barb

Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
Full-timimg with our cat Shadow (16 yrs old)
2002 Alpine 36 MDDS (Figment II), 2004 Subaru Forester toad (Mischief)
Blog: http://www.barbanddave.net
SPK# 90761 FMCA #F337834


#6 George Stoltz

George Stoltz

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 2837 posts
  • SKP#:99899

Posted 13 August 2012 - 10:19 PM

20x50 sites minimum. Level front to back, slight tilt to side for drainage ok. Utilities in the middle. Open sky to the southwest for satellites. Full hookup with 50 amp power. Roads wide enough to allow ease in getting into and out of sites. If you are going to offer cable and WiFi, make sure it is decent and works. Walking area for pets and also for adults.
These are some back of the napkin types of things you should think about. But the best thing you can do is rent an RV and go RVing.
Barb


Amen to everything Barb and the other posters have said. Unless you drive in and set up a Travel Trailer, a Fifth Wheel, a Class C and a 40 foot diesel pusher you are "shooting in the dark."

And hire the best damn electrician you can find because we are tired of dealing with Mickey Mouse electrical systems.
George Stoltz



#7 ZEPPY

ZEPPY

    New Member

  • All Members
  • 4 posts

Posted 14 August 2012 - 05:27 AM

Thanks for the great information, exactly what I was looking for.
Any suggestions for turning radius within the park. My thought is to make only a portion of it accessible for motorhomes. I think if I design the entire park for motorhomes that I will need to remove a lot more trees. Right now my layout has 50'x100' sites, meaning the whole site is 50'x100' and then I will clear an area within for use. Barbaraok suggest 20'x50' minimum, any other suggestions? I can clear as much as need to but I want to maintain the privacy.

I have read many problems regarding electrical. I know nothing about electrical and I am working with an electrician. My assumption was that 100% 50amp service was the way to go.

I am planning on WiFi but haven't investigated the cost. How important is it? This may lead to the question of whether this is a campground or an RV park. I guess I would call it a campground but it will have about 80% full hookups.

Cable - not sure, my assumption is that it will be expensive. How important is it? Willing to pay more? In this area full hookup sites go for $34 - $39. I am thinking that I would need to charge a little more if I have new/professional facilities. They aren't building campgrounds around here and my thought is that it will be refreshing for campers to have new and clean facilities.

How important are pull through sites? How much more would you pay?

Diagonal vs straight in sites?

The property is 130ac and there will plenty of trails

Rif - I hope to appeal to both the tent/family crowd and the RVing crowd. The property is fairly large and my plan is to provide a variety of site types. There will be an area around the pool/playground/etc that is a little more densly developed and perhaps even a section with a "field/parking lot with utilities". Another section that is more sparsley developed but still somewhat near "the action" and a third section that is more removed/private/quiet. Don't really know what to expect but it may be likely that the third section ends up being mostly full season campers/RVers.

I plan on 20' wide roads that are mostly one way.

The property has Connecticut River frontage and I plan on having docks. A public boat launch is about a mile away.

The property is 6 miles from an interstate exit

Is there a general rule for utility location (sewer and electric on the right, water on the left??? sewer in back, water in the front????)

My current layout has the water and electric in the roads and the sewer across the back of the sites.

I don't really feel that it is feasible for me to become familiar with the different types of RVs and it may provide a false sense of confidence. There is a RV dealer nearby, I thought I may be able to pick his brain.

I will stop for now, I don't want to scare everybody away.

Thanks again and keep the tips coming

Zeppy

#8 Larry Nigro

Larry Nigro

    Senior Member

  • Validated Members
  • 101 posts

Posted 14 August 2012 - 06:13 AM

Hello
Some pull thru's would be nice. Angle back in sites to the road so backing in is easier. Do not place rocks in locations that make it difficult to back in or turn.

#9 Biker56

Biker56

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 4368 posts

Posted 14 August 2012 - 06:34 AM

I don't stop for overnight at any campground that doesn't have Pull thru's. Not going to unhook my toad.
With 100' to work with shouldn't be a extra charge. Unless you are going to have a KOA campground. :)

A lot of new campgrounds now are almost 100% pull thru. Some now with the long sites even have 2 locations for sewer hook ups.

Full Time since Oct. 1999
99 Discovery 34Q DP | ISB Banks PowerPack
Datastorm | VMSpc | Co-Pilot Live | Pressure Pro
2014 MKS EcoBoost Toad
369070033.jpg

 


#10 Clay L

Clay L

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1098 posts

Posted 14 August 2012 - 07:37 AM

All utilities should be on the drivers side about in the middle edge of the space length where the RV will be parked.
Remember that most RVs today will have slides. Many will have compartment doors on the slides that open upward so the utility pedestals need to be on the edge of the space so the doors can open.

Clay(WA5NMR), Lee(Wife), Katie & Kelli (cats)
Full timed for eleven years in our 2004 Winnebago Sightseer 35N Workhorse chassis. Snowbirds for 1 year. Now settled down in western CO.
Honda Accord toad.
 


#11 Technomadia

Technomadia

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 516 posts
  • SKP#:116760

Posted 14 August 2012 - 07:43 AM

Personally.. a pull-thru is a nice to have if we're just overnighting, but more often than not we select a back-in site if it gives us more privacy. Unhooking the toad isn't that big of a problem for us, and if we're given a great site - we're more tempted to extend our stay. When we look for sites for staying at particularly more than a night, we love ones that make us feel like we're more in a neighborhood with space around us, instead of a parking lot. We're full timers and grow weary if we're crammed in too often with neighbors that we could share a cup of coffee out our window with.

If you decide to do a section of the park that is not big rig friendly, make sure it is clearly marked and your staff is giving clear directions to people's sites. It can be difficult sometimes to just arrive and be trying to find your site, and make a wrong turn. If there's no where for a big rig to turn around or get back on the right track, you may end up with some awkward situations. Keep in mind those of us pulling tow behind vehicles (ie. toads) can't back-up without unhitching. Most of assume that all roads within an RV park are accessible.

I like the idea of your park serving a variety of needs. But I also caution you when trying to appeal to RVers/campers of all types - the needs of someone on vacation, someone just passing through and someone looking for a longer term seasonal site as a full/long timer are very different. As kid-free full time RVers, we're not all that interested in staying at 'family vacation destinations' unless there is a definite distinction between the areas. We want to be peacefully at home, not living in the middle of a playground. And if my camp fee is including amenities like a pool, we get sort of ticked off that we can't utilize the pool without lots of kids always around. Not that kids shouldn't be using the pool, just that I prefer some adult swim hours where I can swim some laps in peace without beach balls hitting my head :) Also, if you're trying to appeal to full timers and/or longer term stays, things like ample laundry machines is a big plus!

We work on the road as we roam - online. So for us, either having solid reliable WiFi or being situated in a solid fast cellular bandwidth area is absolutely essential. And if you offer WiFi, do it right and make sure there is ample bandwidth and coverage at your sites. We grow so tired of parks advertising free fast WiFi, we pay our fees and then discover the WiFi is barely useable for even general surfing. It's kinda like advertising you have 50A electrical, but only 20A is actually delivered. We were just invited in to review a newer park that heavily advertised free fast WiFi, only to discover it was barely usable ... and then forced you to buy a 'day pass' to get access to faster speeds. Only, once you paid - it was actually slower! Turns out, they only had 1.5 mps coming into the entire park for 130+ sites. Ouch.


As far as placement of your hook-ups, different RV types and manufacturers vary so much.. that it can difficult to get it exactly right. On our Class-A motorhome (a vintage bus conversion), all our hook-ups are on the driver side of the coach, mid way back. And that seems to be fairly standard.. most hooks ups are either on the driver side and/or rear. Many of us long time RVers, especially full timers, tend to carry all sorts of extensions for sewer, water and electric tho - as the hook-up spots can vary so much site to site.


Best wishes. Really do encourage you to get out RVing yourself before investing in building a park. Or at the very least, hire some folks well versed in RVing to consult with you. Visit a lot of RV parks in your area to get a feel for what your competition is. Also go to the various RV Park review sites and read through reviews to get a feel for what folks like and don't like. And keep in mind.. there are many different types of RVers out here roaming the roads!

- Cherie

Edited by Technomadia, 14 August 2012 - 07:50 AM.

Cherie & Chris (and Kiki *meow*) / Blog: Technomadia.com
Full-time gen-X technomads (technology enabled nomads) since 2006

RV: Zephyr: 1961 GM 4106 bus conversion / Toad: Pixel: 2009 MINI Cooper


#12 BrianT

BrianT

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 4626 posts

Posted 14 August 2012 - 07:50 AM

Not a lot I can add as there are a lot of good suggestions above.

One thing that Barb mentioned was a 20 X 50 site. Having some of that size wouldn't necessarily be a problem for some but for those with larger rigs, that would be extremely cramped.

Our "footprint" when all set up, with the rv opened up and the truck & minivan parked right in front of it but not hooked up, is about 65' long and up to 14' wide... a little wider if you actually expect to open the doors on that minivan parked beside the truck. On numerous occasions where park owners have built small sites, we've seen people park the rv on one spot and take over the next spot over for their vehicles. Often, not much is said when there aren't many in the park. But that doesn't work when the park fills up.

I can't think of ever complaining that a site was too big. But I can definitely think of some sites that were too small that we just couldn't stay there.

Bigger sites tend to cost more money to build as the utilities are more spread out and it takes more land per the number of spaces. But it makes a big difference in how desirable an rv park is, especially with the larger rvs.

Pull through sites are nice, especially for people just passing through. But when the sites are extra large, backing in is much less stressful for those who don't do it as often as trying to back into a very small space with other rvs quite close. I have seen sites that were set up more like "parallel parking" where one had to basically pull over to the side of the road onto their campsite. Not exactly a typical drive through site but something that sometimes can work. Just a thought.

Large rvs need lots of room to turn so sharp turns in the roads can be difficult. Tree limbs can be a problem if they're hanging lower than around 13.5' or so. (I'm at about 12' 8".)

Best of luck getting it figured out. New Hampshire is a beautiful state. And if my wife weren't quite so averse to the cold and snow, it might be a place I'd consider making home someday. :)


Brian

Edited by BrianT, 14 August 2012 - 07:51 AM.


#13 Connie B.

Connie B.

    Senior Member

  • Validated Members
  • 479 posts
  • SKP#:42410

Posted 14 August 2012 - 07:59 AM

Some suggestions:

1. Put electric, water and sewer hookups on left side (driver's side) of RV in the middle. Sewer in back is a BAD idea. Most of us have our hook ups on driver side of the RV. Our particular situation is electric in back, water and sewer near middle of RV.

2. Slant the back in sites. Make sure the opening of the site is wide. Have extra space on the right and left of the opening otherwise the longer RVs will run over your grass. DO NOT put rocks along the edges of your roads or to show the edges of the sites. RVs will hit them as they are in blind spots on an RV.

3. Having some pull through sites is essential. Again slant them. Keep the pull through site straight. Do not have a curved pull through site. Best are concrete or asphalt sites, then gravel, then grass.

4. You will need to have 50 amp, 30 amp and 20 amp at each of your full hookup sites. Other sites should have 30 amp and 20 amp.

5. Please don't makes the sewer connection way above the ground. I understand you don't want rain into the sewer area. But if it's too high it makes it more difficult to dump.

6. To us Wifi is very nice to have. We don't need cable as we have a satellite dish on the top of the rig. We do want an open view of the sky.

7. CUT UP YOUR TREES. We personally need at least 13 ft as a minimum so we do not hit anything on the top of our RV.

8. If you are making the streets 20 feet wide they need to be one way as you have stated. Our RV is 10 1/2 ft wide. Make sure end turns (at end of streets) are wide and long. Many of us do have a wide turning radius. We need lots of room to get around from one street to another. Make sure there is enough parking for cars and tow vehicles. Do not let vehicles park in the street or hanging over the street. This makes it difficult for RVs coming in and out and for them to park. It's nice to have streets that aren't dusty or full of pot holes. Gravel roads are good, asphalt better.

9. Make RV site long enough for RV and towed vehicle or RV and tow vehicle. We are 55 ft when tow vehicle hooked to RV. A 40 ft coach would be about 60 ft long. So you need sites at least 60+ ft long for bigger RVs.

10. We personally don't use the shower/toilet block. We do want trash container fairly near the site. We do like a place to walk every morning. We like to walk 30 minutes each morning and appreciate walking trails or at least good roads to walk up and down on. Do have laundry (3 or 4 washers and dryers are good).

11. Keep campground neat and quiet. We don't like kids/dogs that are noisy and running around. Dogs on leash and picked up after. Kids supervised by adults (parents or grandparents). We don't like campfires but understand families do. If you do allow campfires, have a nice pit and clear around pit.

Some suggestions. Gotta go. :)

Edited by Connie B., 14 August 2012 - 08:01 AM.

1993 Beaver Contessa 300 HP
2002 Jeep Liberty 4 wheel drive
genealogy, rallying, sightseeing
enjoying life

#14 Kirk

Kirk

    Major Contributor

  • Weekend Moderators
  • 21856 posts
  • SKP#:60541

Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:23 AM

My thought is to make only a portion of it accessible for motorhomes. I think if I design the entire park for motorhomes that I will need to remove a lot more trees. Right now my layout has 50'x100' sites, meaning the whole site is 50'x100' and then I will clear an area within for use. Barbaraok suggest 20'x50' minimum, any other suggestions? I can clear as much as need to but I want to maintain the privacy.

First, welcome to the Escapee forums!

I am not sure what you believe a motorhome is, but generally they can get into tighter places that can towed RVs of similar size. If towing a car they may have to unhook if the site is not pull-through, but once that is done they are far more easily parked than the equal sized trailer because of the added length of a tow vehicle. While most of us prefer the pull-through design, that also takes far more space for each site and in most parks is not practical for all locations. I think that you need to visit an RV show or two and study what RVs are like as there is a very wide variety that range from the small trailer with tent sides a selling new for under $10K to the 40'+ fifth wheel towed by a heavy duty truck (the semitrailer tractor) and the biggest bus conversion motorhoomes at 45' long, with four slides and costing $2million.

I have read many problems regarding electrical. I know nothing about electrical and I am working with an electrician. My assumption was that 100% 50amp service was the way to go..

The key is to have the wiring built of heavy wire and providing for enough power to run everything under the sun. Power requirements for RVs continues to increase as we become more and more an electric society,. The best RV parks use power pedestals that are designed for RV use and are readily available. They each have one 50A-120/240V outlet one 30A-120V outlet and one 15/20A-120V outlet and circuit breakers for each one. The system should be able to supply an average of 80A per site as an ideal and no less than 60A per site average total load.

I am planning on WiFi but haven't investigated the cost. How important is it? This may lead to the question of whether this is a campground or an RV park. I guess I would call it a campground but it will have about 80% full hookups.

It is becoming more and more common for any RV that comes along to travel with one or more computers. While many full-time RV folks have their own way to access the internet, very few of the vacation travelers will have and they will be looking for the park which provides it. In addition, if you do offer WiFi, you need to realize that it is vital that it be of good quality and accessible from all sites, which is not easy with many trees. Trees and buildings do block the radio frequencies that are used by WiFi systems so design of that is everything. It is better to not provide it than it is to offer it and then have people arrive and find it unusable.

Cable - not sure, my assumption is that it will be expensive. How important is it? Willing to pay more? In this area full hookup sites go for $34 - $39. I am thinking that I would need to charge a little more if I have new/professional facilities. They aren't building campgrounds around here and my thought is that it will be refreshing for campers to have new and clean facilities.

Cable TV importance depends upon what kind of TV coverage is available over the air. If there are many local stations that can be received with the RV antenna, then cable is not particularly important but if there is very poor TV coverage then cable can become important.

How important are pull through sites? How much more would you pay?

Diagonal vs straight in sites?

Providing at least some pull-through sites is important if you wish to get the one night traffic. They are not as important to those who park for a week or longer. Most people will happily pay $5 or so extra for the longer sites, some areas it may reach as much as $10. The angle of the sites just depends upon the width of the roads. If streets are one way and sites all angle properly, it is far easier to back into an angled site. But they also do not make as effective use of the space in the park.

The property is 130ac and there will plenty of trails ...... I plan on 20' wide roads that are mostly one way.

Hiking trails are a nice touch and tend to be used more by those who stay a bit longer. If you do this you will need to provide for litter patrol of those trails on a frequent basis as nothing will destroy a park's reputation more quickly than trash laying about as well as pet droppings. A fenced area for dogs to run free is also very attractive to many.

The property is 6 miles from an interstate exit

This could be a problem if you hope to attract the folks making a one night stop. It will require more advertising but should be possible. Some traffic is generated by people seeing the park, but good ratings in the major directories is probably the biggest source of customers. You may also want to consider joining one of the discount park associations such as Passport America, at least until you get established.

Is there a general rule for utility location (sewer and electric on the right, water on the left??? sewer in back, water in the front????)

My current layout has the water and electric in the roads and the sewer across the back of the sites.

All modern RVs have the utility connections on the driver's side of the RV. They are not all located in the same location from front to rear so that is more challenging. Most well designed RV parks place all utilities on the driver's side and slightly to the rear of the midpoint. You should also make sure that the utility connections are not so high as to interfere with the extending of a slide if it should happen to be located there. Easy access is important and also pavement all around them to prevent mud and drainage for spilled sewage.

What makes this more interesting is that if you want to promote the good views, motorhomes typically use the windshield at the front like a picture window while the picture window of nearly all fifth wheels is at the rear and that of the travel trailers may be at either end. Thus it is not possible to design to have everyone with the view in the proper direction unless there is a good view at each end of the sites.

I don't really feel that it is feasible for me to become familiar with the different types of RVs and it may provide a false sense of confidence

I think that it is critical for you to learn as much as possible about RVs and about the people who occupy them if you are to be successful. I suggest that you might be well served to spend some time working in a large RV park to learn more about this business and their customers. You could also learn a lot by attending some major RV rallies. The more you learn the better your chances of success. That is one of the reasons that so many successful RV parks hire as many of the employees from the RV traveling public as they can. Work-campers are usually the best source of reasonably priced labor as well as people who understand RVers.

I hope that some of this is helpful to you! Once more, welcome to the forums!

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure
dolphins.jpg
 


#15 GR 'Scott' Cundiff

GR 'Scott' Cundiff

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 666 posts
  • SKP#:113181

Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:23 AM

Approaching your question from a different direction - I'd suggest you ask people to give some of their favorite campgrounds within a reasonable distance of you - then, go and meet the manager/owner and ask for their advice.

Asking campers what they want is, of course, worthwhile. However, they will break the bank if you aren't careful. Asking people in management of successful businesses will help you develop a facility that will keep people happy and, at the same time, keep your campground from being an expensive hobby rather than a money making investment.

Our "Here and There" Blog

2008 6.4L SRW F-350 Diesel - 2007 Hitchhiker 32.5 LKSBG - Superglide Hitch


#16 whj

whj

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1015 posts
  • SKP#:106033

Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:39 AM

Good for you and good luck with the venture. Us baby boomers are supposed to buy Rvs
and take to the roads as we retire so more RV parks/campgrounds will be needed. You seem to have a handle on
what is required. A good mix of seasonal sites and short time sites will provide the steady income that is required.
Your short season will limit the number of RV/campers during the winter but that will not prevent you from doing well.
I have a RV site that I own in the UP of MI that is open from May 1st thru October 15th and we do well within that season.
As far as hookups, for my 5er having all of them on the drivers side works well and having 50 amp will also work because
there are many 30 amp RVs but they can all use the 50 amp plug with a low cost adaptor. Please leave as many trees as you
can but also they must allow for tall RV so they must be trimmed.



2011 F250, diesel, longbed, CC RWD
2012 V-Cross 275 5er

#17 Barbaraok

Barbaraok

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 7685 posts
  • SKP#:90761

Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:52 AM

I don't really feel that it is feasible for me to become familiar with the different types of RVs and it may provide a false sense of confidence. There is a RV dealer nearby, I thought I may be able to pick his brain.



It isn't that you have to be come familiar with every type of RV that is out there - none of us are. But you need to become familiar with RVing. How one goes about entering a site, backing in, getting level, hooking up, unhooking, leaving a site, staying for a few days and using the RV and the area, before you can understand why some beautiful looking parks get such bad ratings and end up with no one wanting to stay, while others that don't look, on the surface, to be so great, are full all of the time and people enjoy being there.


Barb


Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
Full-timimg with our cat Shadow (16 yrs old)
2002 Alpine 36 MDDS (Figment II), 2004 Subaru Forester toad (Mischief)
Blog: http://www.barbanddave.net
SPK# 90761 FMCA #F337834


#18 Rif

Rif

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 4715 posts
  • SKP#:84860

Posted 14 August 2012 - 09:38 AM

I concur with the recommendation that you visit many RV parks and campgrounds in New England, and that you learn all you can about RV's. Based on your comments so far it appears that you have some good intentions and a lot of desire, but you need a lot more information and exposure to RV parks and campgrounds to understand what it will take to pull it off or make it work. Normandy Farms near Foxborough, MA is a large and popular park. Some parts of the park are still rather rustic but other sections are parking lots. It may give you some ideas. That park is at the upper end of development and operating costs. I would guess they have a staff of 50 or more people during the summer months. Certainly most campgrounds and parks are not that high end.

One thing I have not seen mentioned is the kind of roads. Your part of the country can be very wet, especially in the spring. Either paved roads or roads and RV pads with an excellent base and drainage are critical.

As to the utilities, have you discussed this with your local zoning people yet? There are going to be huge issues you will need to address as to the electrical and sewer requirements. Getting approval from the city/county/state regulatory agencies is often the most difficult part of any proposed RV park development. Perhaps it would be wise to seek out someone with professional experience developing RV parks. I'm sure they are out there.

One last question, and I hope I'm not out of line here. Why do you want to do this? If you yourself are not an RV'er and have not spent any time in a campground, what led you to consider this? Is it strictly a financial venture? I'm just curious why anyone who has no RV experience would want to develop an RV park.
2000 Volvo 770, 500HP/1650FP Cummins N14 and 10 Speed Autoshift 3.58 Rear 202" WB, 2002 Teton Aspen Royal 43 Foot, Burgman 650 Scooter

#19 arpijay

arpijay

    Full Member

  • Validated Members
  • 47 posts
  • SKP#:107531

Posted 14 August 2012 - 10:16 AM

I agree with the other posters that the pull-thrus need to be longer. My motor home + toad is 60 feet long. It is annoying to go to a campground that advertises itself as 'big rig friendly' and have the pull-thrus only be 50 feet long or less and have to unhook the toad for an overnight stay. When we are staying in one location for several days I don't mind unhooking and taking a back-in site that is shorter.

Excellent, not just good wi-fi is essential. I work on the internet several hour a day and need a steady connection with reasonable bandwidth. I have a Millenicom Mifi as backup, but that only works if there is a good 3G/4G cell connection nearby. These factors limit where we can stay and have, unfortunately, kept us from getting too far off the beaten track in our travels. Given everybody's connectedness today with laptops, tablets and ereaders the need for high-quality, high-bandwidth wi-fi is only going to increase. You can offer mediocre wi-fi as 'free' to your customers but if you are going to have people pay extra to access it then it better be a high-quality connection.

I have satellite TV but if you're going to keep trees that block access to satellites (nothing wrong with that and usually much appreciated) then you will need to think about providing cable. When we can use our satellite TV it is nice to have access to local channels as well, but then the other cable/satellite channels are redundant.

If you are 6 miles off the interstate then you will need to think about being a destination park and what amenities you are going to offer. To attract families with younger children then you will need to have a playground and probably a swimming pool. Hiking trails are nice, but be sure to have at least one that is handicap/elder friendly.

Good luck with your project. We frequently travel through New England so I look forward to seeing how it turns out.

Edited by arpijay, 14 August 2012 - 10:18 AM.

Richard, Susan and our bipolar Siamese, Mister Meowto.
2008 Tiffin Phaeton 40' DP with a Ford Transit Connect toad.

"A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving." - Lao Tzu

#20 Jack Mayer

Jack Mayer

    Major Contributor

  • Weekend Moderators
  • 18829 posts
  • SKP#:60376

Posted 14 August 2012 - 10:34 AM

WiFi in trees is going to be problematic. However if you start out with wifi in mind, then you can easily resolve the issues. There are various ways to handle it, which I will not go into here. But it is something that will require design work at the beginning of the design process. If you ever get to the point of buying land and getting permits, let me know and I'll provide additional info. One key to wifi is to have good backhaul capabilities. If you do not have at least 5 mbps available via DSL or cable at your location, you are not going to be able to provide very satisfactory wifi to your customers. In fact, I would say if you do not have at least a consistent 2mbps then you should not attempt a system.

Sites should be angled. I agree with Kirk that it does utilize a "little" more property, but it makes for a far better user experience. With properly angled sites and one way streets you "might" get by with 20' roads, but they will be tight. Especially for larger rigs. But in that area of the country there are not a lot of larger rigs....in general.

Cable may be possible where you are, but in many rural locations there is not chance to have cable. And I can tell you that cable is ALWAYS a maintenance nightmare in a park. ALWAYS. So consider that aspect carefully. If however you have a cable company that also supports Internet you will have an advantage for deployment of wifi, since you can scatter nodes around the park easily.

Jack & Danielle Mayer #60376 Lifetime Member

PLEASE no PM's. Email me.
2015 New Horizons 44.5' Custom 5er; New Horizons Ambassador

2009 Volvo 780,  D16 515/1850, 230" wb, I-Shift,  custom smart hauler deck by Herrin
2012 smart Passion, piggyback on the truck
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
See our website for info on New Horizons 5th wheels, HDTs as tow vehicles, communications on the road, and use of solar power
www.jackdanmayer.com