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Headed to Big Bend NP


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#1 BillandKathy

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:54 PM

On Sept 29 we started a thread about travelling to the southwest.  We’re here - currently in Livingston, TX and we will be going to San Antonio (The Alamo) then to Big Bend NP.

 

One route to the NP is taking us west on I-10 to Fort Stockton, then south on US-67 and TX-118 to Terlingua.  This route would take us near the Caverns of Sonora which some of you recommended.

 

Another route has us going west on US-90 to Marathon, then south on US-385, through the NP to TX-118 to Terlingua.

 

A third choice takes us west on US-90 to Alpine, then south on TX-118 to Terlingua.

 

Info from anyone who has visited Big Bend is appreciated.  Not just for the route but also campgrounds and sites not to miss.  This will be our first - and probably the only - trip to this part of the country.

 


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#2 LindaH

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 04:11 PM

We've been to Big Bend only once and went in via Marathon.  We stayed at an RV park just outside the park, Stillwell Store and RV Park, which is on a working ranch.  There's a nice museum on site dedicated to the matriarch of the Stillwell clan, Hallie Stillwell, that's well worth visiting.  The only downside to staying there was that it was a long way to the main part of the NP.  https://stillwellstore.com/

 

At the time we were there, several years ago, we drove down to the end of the road (which ends at the Rio Grande River) on which Stillwell Ranch is located, and had lunch at a small road-side diner.  It was very good food, but checking Google Maps, there's nothing there, so guess he's moved on. 


Edited by LindaH, 02 January 2017 - 04:12 PM.

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#3 2gypsies

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 04:58 PM

Big Bend is one of our favorite parks and we've been there quite a few times.  Either of the three routes has you going by and hopefully stopping at some nice attractions.

 

On 90 just west of Del Rio at Comstock is Seminole Canyon State Park and it has a great tour to some ruins

 

At Fort Davis, near Alpine, is another very nice state park and nearby is McDonald Observatory and their night presentation of the stars is excellent.

 

Caverns of Sonora are also very nice on I-10 and has a campground.

 

You didn't say where you're heading from Big Bend but if it's further west you would also have a choice of Carlsbad Caverns Nat'l Park or in Benson, Arizona at Kartchner Caverns State Park. The Rotunda Room tour is excellent. (We gave it.) :)  So if you want to do caverns along your route you have choices. They are all completely different. Sonora is very small but it allows you to walk close to the formations. Carlsbad is huge and is not a living cave and as such, you won't see a lot of dripping, growing formations.  Kartchner is a living cave and continue to grow so you'll hear a lot of dripping. The tour is exceptionally well done with nice lighting.

 

So... as you're heading closer to Big Bend you keep mentioning of the routes ending in Terlingua.  Have you made up your mind to stay there? It isn't part of the national park.  I would highly recommend you stay in the park at Rio Grande Village (reservations) at either the no hookup campground which has very nice spacious sites and trees. There's a water fill and dump station along with a small grocery for basics, a laundry and coin showers. There's also fuel, but expensive. Next door is a RV park which has full hookups but it's on pavement and just a line of RVs parked together.  These are in a very scenic part of the park with some hiking in the vicinity and beautiful mountain views.  There are two other campgrounds in the park. Cottonwood is very pleasant along the river but generators are not allowed. Take the Santa Elena hike there.  The other, Chisos Basin, necessitates a curvy mountain road to get to it so there's a RV length limitation and you would be too long.  Do drive up there though in your car. It's beautiful and some very nice hiking. I believe there's a restaurant there, also.

 

If heading to one of the park's campgrounds come in via 385 to Panther Junction where there's a fuel station and the Visitor Center for maps and brochures.

 

Lots of choice.... you might have to return!


Edited by 2gypsies, 02 January 2017 - 05:02 PM.

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#4 Barbaraok

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 05:20 PM

We went across on US 90 at Marathon, turned south towards Big Bend.   We decided to stay at Stillwell Store & RV Park, which is a hoot and I thoroughly recommend it.  Yes, it is a drive into the National Park, but we had a full hookups, free WiFi, and it was so quiet at night even the cats slept through the dawn.    We enjoyed each day's visit into the park (spent almost a week there) and each evening returned to go over our adventures for the day, recharge and enjoy the evening.  

 

I would also recommend spending a few days in Ft. Davis, not only because of the old Fort, but also take a day to go up to McDowell Observatory one evening when they are having a star party - you won't regret it.


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#5 Al Florida

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 05:43 PM

First off, this a great time to go Big Bend (BB).  "Usually" you have bright sunny days with little wind.  Highs in the 60's to the 70's in the low country along the Rio Grande River.  Lows in early morning are usually down to right at freezing for a couple of hours.  That is not to say you can't have a winter storm come though and have 2-3 days of cloudy, windy weather. It almost never goes down into the mid 20's along the river.  Stay at the NP Rio Grande Village (RGV) CG.  Dry camping under the cottowood trees.  Plenty of sun in January as all the leaves have dropped. 

 

We live in San Antonio and are heading to BB Jan 22.   This will be somewhere between our 20th and 25th trip to BB in the last 47 years. 

 

About your route to BB:

 

I don't want to take anything away from the Sonora Caverns.  They are very nice and worth seeing.

 

However you are going into the the Chihuahuan Desert a unique area with great history and desert plants which are unique to the area.

 

I would strongly recommend going to BB on US-90 through Del Rio and Marathon. 

 

From San Antonio, make your first stop at Seminole Canyon SP about 200 miles from SA.  I suggest staying two nights. 

 

The first morning you are there, take the Fate Bell Shelter Tour:  A fairly rugged hike to the Fate Bell Shelter. Protected by a huge cliff overhang, the shelter holds some of Texas’ most spectacular rock art. Tour fee is $5 per person, five years and older. In the winter tours are at 10am & 3pm on Wed-Sun.  The hike is not bad.  You walk down about 150' elevation change of native rock steps & ledges to the canyon bottom and then over to the rock art. 

 

In the afternoon, drive your car about 3 miles west to the Pecos High Bridge overlook for spectacular views of the deep canyon the Pecos River has carved through the limestone.  For pictures of the bridge go to our blog of our trip to BB a few years ago.

 

Your second monring when you leave Seminole Canyon make your first stop  the Texas Visitor Center in Lantry about 20 miles west.  They have a great 1/4 mile nature trail displaying all the different native plants found in the Chihuahuan Desert.  Only takes about 20-30 minutes to tour the garden.  Also there is a recreation of Judge Roy Bean's "Law-West-of-the-Pecos" bar & court house.   If you don't know the story, he had an unrequited love, Lilly Langry and staged a boxing match on a gravel bank in the middle of the Rio Grande river because both the US and Mexico outlawed the sport of boxing.  More info from Wikipedia.  

 

From Lantry head on to BB NP.  Go directly to RGV and find a campsite. RGV CG info  This is by far the best CG in the area for RV's over about 25' long.  All the reservable campsites are pretty well booked up for the weekends, but ONLY 44 of the 100 campsites are reservable.  Just arrive by 1-2pm and you almost guaranteed to find a campsite.  While there is a concession operated FHU CG at RGV, it is a tight parking lot CG.  All the private RV Parks are outside the park and you will have a 45 minute to an hour drive to get to most sights in the park from the RV Parks.


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#6 SWharton

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 05:47 PM

x2 for everything mentioned. Add the Marfa lights to your list also. You can stay overnight at the observation area. Make sure you have enough supplies as it is a long haul to even the convenience store in Study Butte. Loved Big Bend and plan to go back. We stayed in Study Butte and had full hookups. check RVparkreviews.com for additional campgrounds.



#7 Al Florida

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 06:15 PM

While in the park, be sure to take some of the ranger led walks or hike.  A really neat ranger hike about 1.5 miles long, (if they are still doing the hike) is the one about Mountain Lions (Cougars) starting from the Ranger Station in the Chiso Basin.  

 

On a nice warm afternoon or even a cool morning right after sunrise, go to the Hot Springs for a soak.  The water is only about 1.5' deep and right on the river. 

 

If you can hike about 4.5 miles (round trip) with an elevation gain of 1100' take the best hike in the park, Lost Mine Trail.  Even if you can't take the entire hike, at least walk the easy part.  The first 3/4 mile to the Saddle with great views to the east to the river and the mountains in Mexico.  If you can, take this hike early in the morning.  Be at the trail head a soon after first light and get to the saddle for the sun rise.  Fantastic.   For views and some details about Lost Mine Trail, go to my blog here.  Scroll down about half way for the hike. 

 

Another great hike is Santa Elena Canyon.  About 1.6 (round trip).  There is one short 200 yards section of switch backs and then you go inside the canyon. 

 

Download the park newspaper here.   This is the park newspaper they give you as you enter the park. 

 

Drive to Ernst Tinaja if the road is in good condition.  Info about Old Ore road to Ernst Tinaja and Ernst Tinaja in my blog here.


Al & Sharon
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San Antonio, TX

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#8 Al Florida

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 06:25 PM

We've been to Big Bend only once and went in via Marathon.  We stayed at an RV park just outside the park, Stillwell Store and RV Park, which is on a working ranch.  There's a nice museum on site dedicated to the matriarch of the Stillwell clan, Hallie Stillwell, that's well worth visiting.  The only downside to staying there was that it was a long way to the main part of the NP.  https://stillwellstore.com/

 

At the time we were there, several years ago, we drove down to the end of the road (which ends at the Rio Grande River) on which Stillwell Ranch is located, and had lunch at a small road-side diner.  It was very good food, but checking Google Maps, there's nothing there, so guess he's moved on. 

That must have been a long time ago when you went to the end of the road.  :)  The bridge & border crossing has been closed for 25-30 years or more.


Edited by Al Florida, 02 January 2017 - 06:25 PM.

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#9 dzwiss

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 07:43 PM

If you get as far as Marfa, be sure you stop at the Prada store in Valentine.......they've always got some good sales going.


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#10 Chris n Dennis

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 09:31 PM

And of course the  mystery lights of Marfa :) Penny's Diner in Alpine for a good breakfast. Amistad Reservoir is not a bad stop either.


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#11 TXiceman

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 10:46 PM

If you go through Alpine, swing over to visit Davis Mountains State Park and Fort Davis NP at Fort Davis Texas.

 

Ken


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#12 sushidog

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 08:27 AM

Ditto what everyone said. We are frequent, long time visitors too. We will be going back in March. You may think it will be your only trip there, but wait till you see the size of the place. You can't experience it all in a dozen trips. Big Bend Ranch State Park alone (just west of Big Bend NP) is over 300,000 acres, and that's small compared to the NP, at over 800,000 acres. And this doesn't include all the other area attractions mentioned.

 

If you feel up to it, hike the Window Trail from the trailhead in the Chisos Basin CG. The trail actually starts at the lodge, which has a great view of The Window at sunset - not to be missed.  If you are adventurists there is an unadvertised waterfall in the park which has been removed from the maps - but the trail markers are still there. It is where the stream that cut the window pours into the valley below. Needless to say, it is better after a good rain, and right now that hasn't happened in a while. It's called Cattail Falls and you get there off the Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive on an unmarked road to Oak Springs. Here's a Blog with some nice shots of the trail and falls so you can decide if it's worth your time:  http://dawnandjeffsblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/big-bend-np-cattail-falls-hike-day3-prt.html It is a slightly shorter hike than the 3 mile Window Trail up above in the basin, but it is easier going as there is less change in elevation and smoother terrain. This time of the year, is perfect for desert hikes. Regardless take a gallon of water per person, just in case. Both the upper and lower Burro Mesa pour off trails are nice too if you are hikers and have the time (I prefer the lower trail), but see the others first.

 

Don't forget to visit the Big Bend Ranch State Park too. The views from Lajitas to Presidio (FM170) are spectacular. Drive FM 170 if nothing else. http://tpwd.texas.go.../big-bend-ranch

 

Chip



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#13 LindaH

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 08:54 AM

That must have been a long time ago when you went to the end of the road.  :)  The bridge & border crossing has been closed for 25-30 years or more.

 

No, the bridge and border crossing WERE closed.  I didn't say we'd gone into Mexico.  The little *restaurant* (nothing more, really, than a food truck) was at the end of the road on the U.S. side.  We could sit outside as we ate and see the bridge that goes across the Rio Grande.


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#14 Kinsa

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 10:41 AM

Hi, BillandKathy...

 

I'm not very active on this forum any longer since we no longer live/travel full-time in our RV, but I wanted to jump in and say that my husband works at BBNP and our family lives here in the park at Panther Junction.  You've already gotten a lot of great advice in this thread, so I won't bother to repeat much of it.

 

What I did want to mention is that for a full year the kids and I lived in San Antonio while my husband worked/lived at BBNP.  (Obviously, we are all together now.)  As you can imagine, there was a lot of back-n-forth between BBNP and SA.  We found that the best route was to take US-90 and drop down to the park via US-385 in Marathon.  This is the most direct route, and, in my opinion, the most pleasant route.  By going I-10 and dropping down at Fort Stockton you get the usual interstate highway experience, but by taking 90 and dropping down at Marathon you get a real feel for what west Texas is really like.  This, of course, would mean that you miss the Caverns of Sonora, but you would get the experience of stopping in Langtry at the Judge Roy Bean rest stop, which is a not-to-miss experience in and of itself.  My kids love stopping there.  Plus, there is a wonderful overlook of the Pecos River on that route.

 

(By the way, Marathon is pronounced by locals as "Mara-then".  Don't ask me why 'cuz I have no idea.)

 

May I assume from your post that you will be staying in Terlingua at one of the RV resorts?  This is a good option, but I wanted to reiterate that we have large RV sites at the Rio Grande Village here in the park.  Coming the time of year that you are coming, you shouldn't have any trouble getting a space.  Alternatively, Stillwell Ranch, just outside the north park entrance (on US-385) is a popular place for people with large RV's.  If you are traveling down to the park from Marathon, this is a natural place to stop and stay.

 

As for the park itself:

 

 

 

Everything here is measured in B-I-G distances.  Don't let the distance factor scare you.  *EVERYTHING* is "far away".  Haha

 

As for not-to-miss things in the park itself... you didn't mention how long you are staying here, but I would give it several days at the minimum. 

 

The park can be divided into three different "zones" -- mountains, river, and desert floor:

 

If you really aren't into hiking, then there really isn't much to do up in the mountain zone, although it is beautiful up there.  You can drive up to the Chisos Basin, see the visitor center, walk the Window View Trail (not to be confused with the Window Trail), have lunch at the lodge, and be done.  That's an easy day.  If you are into hiking, then there are multiple options.  The ones not to miss would be the Window Trail and the Lost Mine Trail.

 

The river zone is the lush area surrounding the Rio Grande River.  If you go to the Rio Grande Village area, you can take a dip in the Hot Springs, take the nature boardwalk trail over the river, and drive to the Boquillas Canyon Trail.  If you have passports, you can take the rowboat across the Rio Grande then ride a donkey up to the Mexican border town of Boquillas.  This makes for a fun afternoon, but make sure to pay attention to when the border crossing is open.  You don't want to inadvertently end up spending the night in Boquillas!

 

The desert floor area is the largest, and in my opinion the highlight of the park.  If you are into hiking, the Balanced Rock hike is worthwhile (down Grapevine Hills Road), as is the Santa Elena Canyon Trail.  Otherwise, make sure you do the scenic Ross Maxwell Drive down to Castolon (stopping off along the way to see the sights -- Sam Nail Ranch, Homer Wilson Ranch, Sotol Vista, Burro Mesa Pouroff, Mule Ears View  Point, and Tuff Canyon), poke around the old settlement of Castolon for a few minutes, then drive to Santa Elena Canyon.  This is perhaps the signature sight of BBNP.  If you have time and a good high clearance vehicle, drive back on the Old Maverick Road, stopping at Juna's Jacal along the way.

 

Outside the park, I highly recommend visiting the Terlingua Ghost Town (and having a bite to eat at the Starlight Café) and also going further toward the resort town of Lajitas.  There you can meet the famous mayor of Lajitas, the goat named Clay Henry.  Just before you enter Lajitas, stop at the Barton Warnock Visitor Center, which is the visitor center for the Big Bend Ranch State Park.  I can't give you much information about the state park, but I do know that the visitor center museum is nice, and the scenic drive along the Rio Grande is supposedly one of the best in the country.

 

Oh, and I thought I'd mention... the new Fossil Bone Exhibit is having the Grand Opening on Saturday, January 14th.  If you happen to be here then, feel free to join us!

 

Please let me know if you have any questions or need assistance.  Enjoy your visit!


Stephen & Karen and our six boys, ages 20, 20, 18, 16, 13, & 10
Stephen - Military retiree (as of summer 2012) & current DOI employee  (Big Bend National Park)
Karen - Homeschooling stay-at-home mom & veteran
San Antonio, Texas

Fulltimed May 2013 - July 2014 (yes, all eight of us!)
Open Range "Rolling Thunder" (H396RGR - fifth wheel toy hauler bunkhouse) - SOLD
Ford F-350 diesel dually - for the camper
Ford E-350 fifteen passenger van - for the crew

Our unfinished travel blog: http://coach-and-six.blogspot.com/


#15 Kinsa

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 10:53 AM

Oops -- one more thought...
 
Bring your groceries and toiletries with you!  Any amount of shopping turns out to be a major excursion here.  There are some concessionaire-run convenience stores scattered throughout the park (one in Castolon, one in Rio Grande Village, and one at Panther Junction), but they are sparsely stocked and expensive.  The closest shopping is the Cottonwood Store in Study Butte (pronounced Stoo-dee Byoot).  It is fairly well stocked and prices aren't completely unreasonable, but it is small.  Otherwise, you're looking at a trip all the way to Alpine to Porter's grocery store.
 
My absolute biggest challenge living here with a family is keeping the pantry stocked!

Edited by Kinsa, 03 January 2017 - 12:23 PM.

Stephen & Karen and our six boys, ages 20, 20, 18, 16, 13, & 10
Stephen - Military retiree (as of summer 2012) & current DOI employee  (Big Bend National Park)
Karen - Homeschooling stay-at-home mom & veteran
San Antonio, Texas

Fulltimed May 2013 - July 2014 (yes, all eight of us!)
Open Range "Rolling Thunder" (H396RGR - fifth wheel toy hauler bunkhouse) - SOLD
Ford F-350 diesel dually - for the camper
Ford E-350 fifteen passenger van - for the crew

Our unfinished travel blog: http://coach-and-six.blogspot.com/


#16 Kinsa

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 11:01 AM

Ditto what everyone said. We are frequent, long time visitors too. We will be going back in March. You may think it will be your only trip there, but wait till you see the size of the place. You can't experience it all in a dozen trips. Big Bend Ranch State Park alone (just west of Big Bend NP) is over 300,000 acres, and that's small compared to the NP, at over 800,000 acres. And this doesn't include all the other area attractions mentioned.

 

If you feel up to it, hike the Window Trail from the trailhead in the Chisos Basin CG. The trail actually starts at the lodge, which has a great view of The Window at sunset - not to be missed.  If you are adventurists there is an unadvertised waterfall in the park which has been removed from the maps - but the trail markers are still there. It is where the stream that cut the window pours into the valley below. Needless to say, it is better after a good rain, and right now that hasn't happened in a while. It's called Cattail Falls and you get there off the Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive on an unmarked road to Oak Springs. Here's a Blog with some nice shots of the trail and falls so you can decide if it's worth your time:  http://dawnandjeffsblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/big-bend-np-cattail-falls-hike-day3-prt.html It is a slightly shorter hike than the 3 mile Window Trail up above in the basin, but it is easier going as there is less change in elevation and smoother terrain. This time of the year, is perfect for desert hikes. Regardless take a gallon of water per person, just in case. Both the upper and lower Burro Mesa pour off trails are nice too if you are hikers and have the time (I prefer the lower trail), but see the others first.

 

Don't forget to visit the Big Bend Ranch State Park too. The views from Lajitas to Presidio (FM170) are spectacular. Drive FM 170 if nothing else. http://tpwd.texas.go.../big-bend-ranch

 

Chip

 

 

Thought I'd comment on this...

 

Cattail Falls has been closed off to the public for a good reason.  Recent environmental studies (by our park scientists) of the area near the falls are showing profound negative effects from human visitation, to the detriment of the local falls ecosystem.  It is closed off until it can "heal" from the damage.  Please don't visit Cattail Falls.  It needs time to rest and become whole again.  I know it's frustrating, but we have to protect the natural environment or there will be nothing left for future generations.


Stephen & Karen and our six boys, ages 20, 20, 18, 16, 13, & 10
Stephen - Military retiree (as of summer 2012) & current DOI employee  (Big Bend National Park)
Karen - Homeschooling stay-at-home mom & veteran
San Antonio, Texas

Fulltimed May 2013 - July 2014 (yes, all eight of us!)
Open Range "Rolling Thunder" (H396RGR - fifth wheel toy hauler bunkhouse) - SOLD
Ford F-350 diesel dually - for the camper
Ford E-350 fifteen passenger van - for the crew

Our unfinished travel blog: http://coach-and-six.blogspot.com/


#17 Kinsa

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 11:13 AM

Oh!  I just thought of one more thing...  (haha)

 

If you have a mobile device, this free download app is a travel guide for the entire Big Bend area, all the way up to Alpine.  You just play it while you are driving around, and it will narrate as you pass points of interest.  It's a great app to have!

 

https://www.justahea...CFQkMaQodXH0O1w


Stephen & Karen and our six boys, ages 20, 20, 18, 16, 13, & 10
Stephen - Military retiree (as of summer 2012) & current DOI employee  (Big Bend National Park)
Karen - Homeschooling stay-at-home mom & veteran
San Antonio, Texas

Fulltimed May 2013 - July 2014 (yes, all eight of us!)
Open Range "Rolling Thunder" (H396RGR - fifth wheel toy hauler bunkhouse) - SOLD
Ford F-350 diesel dually - for the camper
Ford E-350 fifteen passenger van - for the crew

Our unfinished travel blog: http://coach-and-six.blogspot.com/


#18 Al Florida

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 06:59 AM

Ditto what everyone said. We are frequent, long time visitors too. We will be going back in March. You may think it will be your only trip there, but wait till you see the size of the place. You can't experience it all in a dozen trips. Big Bend Ranch State Park alone (just west of Big Bend NP) is over 300,000 acres, and that's small compared to the NP, at over 800,000 acres. And this doesn't include all the other area attractions mentioned.

 

If you feel up to it, hike the Window Trail from the trailhead in the Chisos Basin CG. The trail actually starts at the lodge, which has a great view of The Window at sunset - not to be missed.  If you are adventurists there is an unadvertised waterfall in the park which has been removed from the maps - but the trail markers are still there. It is where the stream that cut the window pours into the valley below. Needless to say, it is better after a good rain, and right now that hasn't happened in a while. It's called Cattail Falls and you get there off the Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive on an unmarked road to Oak Springs. Here's a Blog with some nice shots of the trail and falls so you can decide if it's worth your time:  http://dawnandjeffsblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/big-bend-np-cattail-falls-hike-day3-prt.html It is a slightly shorter hike than the 3 mile Window Trail up above in the basin, but it is easier going as there is less change in elevation and smoother terrain. This time of the year, is perfect for desert hikes. Regardless take a gallon of water per person, just in case. Both the upper and lower Burro Mesa pour off trails are nice too if you are hikers and have the time (I prefer the lower trail), but see the others first.

 

Don't forget to visit the Big Bend Ranch State Park too. The views from Lajitas to Presidio (FM170) are spectacular. Drive FM 170 if nothing else. http://tpwd.texas.go.../big-bend-ranch

 

Chip

The link to your blog entry about Cattail Falls doesn't work.  It has some extra stuff on the end.  Here is an updated link.  The unpaved road to the trail head is now closed to public use.  You can still hike to falls, but there is an extra 2-3 miles round trip walking to do.  They closed it to reduce the number of people visiting the falls.  Cattail Falls is the water source for the Chisos Basin.  I agree it is a very nice hike and the falls and pond at the bottom are beautiful.  

 

I'm enjoying your blog entries about BB NP, good work.


Al & Sharon
2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R
2009 Chevy Colorado Toad
San Antonio, TX

http://downtheroadar...d.blogspot.com/

 


#19 Al Florida

Al Florida

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 07:02 AM

Oh!  I just thought of one more thing...  (haha)

 

If you have a mobile device, this free download app is a travel guide for the entire Big Bend area, all the way up to Alpine.  You just play it while you are driving around, and it will narrate as you pass points of interest.  It's a great app to have!

 

https://www.justahea...CFQkMaQodXH0O1w

Just be aware there is very limited to NO cell reception inside the park. Also limited to no reception in most of the BB area.  Just assuming the app needs cell phone reception to work.


Al & Sharon
2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R
2009 Chevy Colorado Toad
San Antonio, TX

http://downtheroadar...d.blogspot.com/

 


#20 BillandKathy

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 12:47 PM

Thanks for all the great responses.

 

We’ve decided to take US-90 and stop in Del Rio for a few days.  We’ll stop in Marathon for supplies, then go south on US-385, through the park.  If we can get a site we’ll stay at the Rio Grand Village CG.  If not we’ll go to Terlingua.  We need hookups, we have a residential frig in our RV. 

 

You gave us a lot of info what to see and do and we appreciate it.  We plan to stay two weeks, and from what you have all said I hope that’s enough time.  We can always extend our stay in the area – that’s what’s great about being retired and in an RV.  We have to be back in PA mid-May but no set schedule until then.

 

After we leave Big Bend we plan to go to Carlsbad Caverns – depending on weather - then west to Arizona.  One post said to avoid US-285 from Pecos to Carlsbad because the road is bad due to the number of tanker trucks that use that route and the traffic is bad 24/7.

 

When the weather permits we’ll head north to the Grand Canyon, Utah, Wyoming and east.  We want to visit as many NP’s as we can.


Bill & Kathy & Strider our GSD
Bill - Navy Vet, Retired Police Officer
Kathy - Retired Office Manager
2014 Thor Chateau 33SW, Safe-T-Plus
2011 Chevy HHR