Rich&Sylvia

RV garage structure planning help needed

41 posts in this topic

I did lots of research on that subject. I ended up using radiant barrier and discovered that if it was placed on the inside of the sheet metal skin=R2. Frame a wall inside that skin and just use the radiant barrier=R8. Use the girts that the building is framed with, lay down an angle on the floor to attach the barrier and have an 8" air gap=R20. Same material and VERY cost effective. The air gap adds R value and it works well, esp in full sun.

I didnt even consider spray on insulation because its a fab shop and sparks do fly.

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My shop and living quarters both have 4" insulation in the walls and ceiling. As mentioned. I have an 8" air gap then 1/2" OSB, 2x4, then 4" insulation and 5/8" drywall. I'll let you know in a couple months when I'm done building how well it works. LOL

In the work shop area I just have 2x4 with plywood on the inside painted white.

 

 

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Great ideas! You may also want to consider a framing that would support a storage loft. Solar is almost a must if possible. Panel are very cheap now even the 48 volt ones, Do not forget to insulate the building. Good building!

 

Safe Travels!

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Here is my complete build thread from another site. http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/shop-tools/910020-40x60-shop-build.html

That is a very nice buildout. Thanks for posting the link. It gives me some food for thought on my own future project. In my case I'll use mini-split technology for HVAC so slightly different in that area. But the building stuff rocks....

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Randy

 

Why is insulating a steel building a problem? My father had a construction company for 50 years building Stran Steel buildings. Started with the old Quonsets and then moved to straight wall. I can tell you we insulated hundreds from Church buildings to Gyms and schools to huge farm equipment dealerships. The biggest we ever built was 500' long, 160' wide with 33' foot side walls. My father was pissed at me one Saturday morning when I was in HS and as punishment I got to spend the day sweeping it out with a push broom.

 

Dennis

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That is a very nice buildout. Thanks for posting the link. It gives me some food for thought on my own future project. In my case I'll use mini-split technology for HVAC so slightly different in that area. But the building stuff rocks....

Your welcome Jack, thank you for sharing your wealth of knowledge.

My original plan was to use a mini split system but I couldn't sell the girlfriend on it.

I figured since I was moving her from a nice tract home near the beach.

Into a metal building in the desert, I could make a couple concessions on my ideas. LOL :D

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DJW Most steel buildings are expensive to insulate and the insulation fails to be very good. Air infiltration and the steel conducts the cold and heat. I want my building heated and cooled economically. The infloor heat that is in my garage is something I also like.

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Randy

 

Why is insulating a steel building a problem? My father had a construction company for 50 years building Stran Steel buildings. Started with the old Quonsets and then moved to straight wall. I can tell you we insulated hundreds from Church buildings to Gyms and schools to huge farm equipment dealerships. The biggest we ever built was 500' long, 160' wide with 33' foot side walls. My father was pissed at me one Saturday morning when I was in HS and as punishment I got to spend the day sweeping it out with a push broom.

 

Dennis

If he is running a fab shop, spray foam insulation is a bad idea unless covered with plywood. I've seen a spark burn into spray foam insulation and actually burn inside the wall.... nasty fumes and a mess to clean up.

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I'd like to hear more about insulating a steel building. Particularly installation hanging or spraying issues. In the steel building I visualize building I would either use the batt insulation they hang with the steel, or spray foam it later. I have potential issues with spray foam because of off-gassing. I have lung issues. But that does seem to be the best insulation. Cost is not a major factor in my thinking. If the cost/benefit analysis favors foam, then I'd do foam. Especially for the roof. There is no issue with sidewall exposure at least at the base of the walls....I'd plywood the unfinished areas.

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DJW Most steel buildings are expensive to insulate and the insulation fails to be very good. Air infiltration and the steel conducts the cold and heat. I want my building heated and cooled economically.

I have not found that to be a problem, if the building is insulated during construction, as mine was. Out community is mostly made up of steel buildings and the majority (mine & the community center included) used rolls of plastic/fabric backed insulating bat material that is rated at R19, when complete. Both walls and roof are done in that same way. There are also buildings in the community that use the spray-on insulating foam and while it doesn't seem to be quite as durable it does work. The down side to the spray on is that when open to the outside, there have been problems with woodpeckers.

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A number of people here in Colorado have gone to wood framed buildings with steel siding and roofs so that heavier insulation can be used economically. They use residential style roofs with ceilings insulated to R30 or more. They use building wraps under the siding and insulate the wall. Drywall is added to provide a clean, fire resistant shell. I haven't done any price/benefit analysis so I was wondering what others thought. In many colder climates R30 is the minimum recommended ceiling insulation. This setup with infloor heat makes for a pretty nice work environment. To take it a step further I was considering a heat system using solar hotwater panels to heat the floor. I have this in my garage now. The floor is excavated 2 to 3 feet below grade and then insuated on the side and bottom. As the area is brought back to grade PEX water loops are installed about midway and then again in the concrete. When called for the hot water from the panels is circulated in the floor and earth mass. The earth mass is several thousand pounds and will retain the heat for days. A boiler or hotwater heater can be used for backup.

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I would do a drain in the floor in the RV bay and full hookups for the trailer/coach.

 

Here is a very nice setup, although the room design is weird and wastes lots of space. I would do that much differently.

 

https://mortonbuildings.com/project/4120

A floor drain in a good idea except if you plan on doing any work that would depend on the floor to be used for fabrication of steel or wood, like walls framed on the floor and then stood up. Makes it real hard to keep things straight which will then transfer to not plumb when stood up. I'd rather have a floor as flat as I can get it, and if I need to use water, try to do that outdside.

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Sometimes you can rent a portable man lift that you can use as a lifting device. I did that when I built my garage. Something like this is what I am thinking: https://www.google.com/search?q=towable+man+lift&biw=1600&bih=767&site=webhp&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwi0loCJ57LRAhUJ9YMKHb6QCL0Q_AUIBygC I can't get a picture to paste on here.......

That might only have a 500lb lift.

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That might only have a 500lb lift.

That's the reason I said "Something like this". However, there are ground controls that can be used so that you do not have the extra weight of the operator in the basket. I rented one with a quick attach basket and there was a hook supplied for lifting purposes.

Edited by Mntom

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