Ron

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About Ron

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  1. I just went to the "disconnect me" website and my Java Script Blocker detected that they were using canvas fingerprinting - hummm.
  2. Thanks for reporting back on your decision. Please let us know later how you like it. ----ron
  3. The charts here provide some interesting perspective on up periods, down periods, and the cyclical nature of those over varying periods of time. https://www.advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/2017/05/05/the-latest-look-at-the-total-return-roller-coaster ----ron
  4. I don't disagree and I'm not sure why you think I do. Most policies I'm familiar with will not reimburse above the actual appraised or NADA value unless you have a "total loss replacement/purchase price value" coverage. To my knowledge this coverage is more expensive and generally only applies to an RV that is less than one or two years old.
  5. Exactly! I just assumed it would go down with age. Our Progressive policy has three coverage options. When we first took out the policy we were required to state what its value was at that time and we stated it was worth what we paid for it (it was virtually new at that time). Over all these years of renewals we were never asked again to update this stated value. The trailer's value upon which the premium was determined was never stated on the document called "coverages" or on the document called "declarations". I was aware that we had the coverage called "Actual Cash Value" and that our coverage would not exceed "the actual cash value" or the "rating base" whichever was less. The only way I stumbled upon the fact that my premium was still being based on the trailer's value that I provided to them 10 years ago when I applied for this insurance was when I went to one of their web pages that allowed me to change my coverages and give me a new premium quote based on the changes. There I saw that original value and when I changed that value to what NADA indicated as the estimated current value I found that the premium dropped significantly. So, the lesson learned is that you can not assume that your insurance company is adjusting the value of your RV as it gets older for purposes of setting your premium. They will certainly adjust it if you ever have a total loss! This certainly applies to any RVers who have Progressive Co. insurance and might apply to others as well. This change only affected my comp & collision premium but it reduced the total cost of the annual premium by 21%. As an aside I also learned a couple more things about my coverage that may not be common knowledge unless one spends time studying their policy. First, my policy makes a clear distinction between the coverage for property stored in a "storage shed" vs. a "a secured storage location". Second I learned what my coverage for "loss assessment" was all about. Full timers really need to understand these coverages and I'm disappointed with myself for not understanding them until now. ---ron
  6. Just a heads-up in case others might not be aware of this issue regarding your RV insurance policy. Today I was reviewing our truck and trailer insurance policies. I don’t do this often enough since we have had the same rig for many years. I’m probably the last one to figure this out but I learned something today that will save us a nice piece of change. I learned that our insurance company sets the premium for the trailer’s comprehensive and collision based on the trailer’s value we declared to them several years ago. The coverage, however, is for actual value at time of loss so this was causing our premium to be quite a bit higher than it could have been. I checked the value of the trailer on the NADA website. The insurance company was willing to accept the “low value” from NADA for computing the premium. This is advantageous since regardless of what they accept and base the premium on, they will pay the appraised value at the time of the loss even if it’s higher than this NADA estimate. From now on I’ll be changing this estimated value before every policy renewal. ---ron
  7. Could very well be the water pump, a hose, or a gasket. Determine exactly what's leaking before trying to fix it. ---ron
  8. ....The only issue I have is my fridge sits over the furnace so the bottom is 16" from the floor. The new one would be 60" tall, so it may be an issue for my wife since she stands 5'3".... My wife just calls me when she needs something from the upper part of the fridge - problem solved! ---ron
  9. I looked into the Anderson a year or two ago. I can understand how it might be very effective controlling sway but the geometry of the chains in tension horizontally vs. having vertical tension as with most other weight distributing hitches convinced me that it would not be nearly as effective as the Equalizer for weight distribution. Some internet research and conversations on other forums confirmed my suspicion.
  10. I'm curious how satisfied you are with your Blue Ox hitch. It just isn't intuitively obvious to me how its design really does much in the way of sway control. Do you have any evidence that it prevents sway as good or better than the Equal-i-zer? Also, have you been able to transfer a large percentage of the hitch weight with their spring bars? I've been towing with an Equalizer for over 10 years and I'm pretty satisfied with it. Through quite a bit of experimentation I've been able to "dial-in" all the adjustments and get rid of all the irritating noises. Also, I've found the company really stands behind their product. They are very responsive when I have questions and they've replaced several parts that have failed free of charge regardless of the age of the unit. I do not have any problems with sway using this unit.
  11. I agree. Before we started full timing we stored our trailer in a storage lot in the Los Angeles basin. I had terrible black streak problems. After we left CA and started full timing we had very minimal black streak problems. I used to wash the roof once or twice a year but now I haven't done it in probably the last 8 years or so. Our trailer is about 14 years old and the rubber roof is still doing its job. The trailer has never been stored indoors. ron
  12. We have a 13.5 K BTU AC and we're able to operate it with our 3KW Yamaha Generator. We've never tried to operate it at high elevations; usually when we're in the mountains we just don't need it. We have used it at 3,000 or 4,000 feet without problems. I do know that I can tell our generator has significantly less power at high elevations. I've read that gasoline generator power needs to be derated by 3% per 1,000 feet above sea level. I guess if our generator (50% more power than yours) can operate our AC (47% higher BTU than yours) then I suspect you'll be okay up to 4,000 feet for sure but I seriously doubt you'll be able to operate it above 6,000 feet.
  13. For mail forwarding and permanent address we've been with Terri at My Dakota Address for 10 years and are very satisfied with her service. When we first became SD residents she referred us to First Madison Ins. just down the street from her business place. They are an independent agent and very familiar with all companies that deal with full-time Rvers. We've been very happy with their service. We do all our banking with a nationwide company over the internet. We get our medical, dental, and vision services in various states where most convenient. We don't have a CPA in SD since we have no state income tax or other tax issues in that state. We had our trust and wills re-done to conform with SD law while making some other desired changes to them. For that we used Brad C. Grossenburg at Woods Fuller Shultz & Smith P.C. in Sioux Falls. My research a few years ago led me to believe he was one of the foremost trust/estate attorneys in SD. We've now had him update our trust and wills a second time and are very pleased with his service.
  14. Have you considered a used ¾ ton SUV like a Chevy Avalanche or Chevy Suburban. These vehicles are SUVs in some respects but were built on heavy duty frames much like a pickup. For the past 10 years we've been towing a 23' TT that weighs 10,000# fully loaded. We tow with a 2004 Chevy Avalanche and, IMO, it's the ideal tow vehicle for our purposes. It's our only vehicle so when we're unhitched to makes a very comfortable 5 passenger vehicle. The rear has lots of covered, locked, storage space for the generator and other "stuff". We have over 170K miles on it with almost no problems. It has a towing capacity rating of 10,100# so no built-in margin but we can tow anywhere and hardly know the trailer is back there.
  15. Some FSBOs are posted on Zillow.com, some are on the club house bulletin board, and some have a sign on the lot. Are you looking for a large lot or a small lot? Are you looking for a "bare lot" or a lot with a house? If a house are you looking for a park model, mobile home, modular home, or site built home? I walk around NR a lot for exercise and can send you information if you narrow down what you are interested in. ----ron