Jeff & Suzanne

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About Jeff & Suzanne

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  • Location
    Homewood, Illinois
  • Interests
    Theatre directing, acting, drum & bugle corps, hockey, Broadway, old movies, WWII re-enacting

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  1. Just an FYI... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJljuPxwUPc
  2. Macodiva. . .sent you a private message. Good hunting. = Two Hams =
  3. This gentleman reminds us of many of the Casita forum members when we owned our Casita. They would pretty much refer to any 5th wheel, Class A or larger travel trailer as "sun blockers" and criticize the occupants for sitting inside enjoying their respective pursuits instead of having to sit outside when weather permits. As former fulltimers having lived in a 30ft Airstream trailer and a 40ft Foretravel, we never did fit in. JimK, you are welcome to join us further down this forum to the RV Types Section and look at the Class B and Class C threads. But, please leave the drama behind; there isn't room for much when one is living small. . .just sayin'.
  4. In 20 years of RVing, we have always used Progressive surge protectors. Our current one is this one... https://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Industries-EMSPT50C-Surge-Protector/dp/B004AQR53K Notice the metal plate around the cord. . .I padlock that to one of these... https://smile.amazon.com/UShake-Resettable-Combination-Complimentary-Mounting/dp/B0151RQAX2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1496071777&sr=8-3&keywords=bicycle+lock When the bicycle lock is properly wrapped around the power pedestal it is very difficult for a "thief of opportunity" to grab it and run. If a dedicated thief is intent on stealing from you, then there isn't much you can do to prevent it with an RV environment. In all of our RV life (knock on wood), by using the above level of prudence with big ticket stuff, we have never had anything taken from our campsites, and we often leave chairs, grill, levelers, etc. out when we leave the site.
  5. Research pre-owned Foretravels http://motorhomesoftexas.com/ Another good research tool is to read the brand's owners forums http://www.foreforums.com/index.php?action=forum
  6. This might help... https://www.google.com/search?q=rv+storage+houston&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
  7. Good choices all. . .we chose Phoenix Cruiser because of their method of construction (no assembly line) and quality of materials-all seen during a factory tour in Elkhart, IN. Plus the fact they haven't been taken over by a third party investor. . .they survived the RV slump by being smart. Watch their website for used inventory http://www.phoenixusarv.com/index.html . . .you can feel confident buying a pre-owned PC from them and know it has been thoroughly vetted and Kermit, the service manager will always be available to answer questions even with a used Phoenix Cruiser.
  8. We owned a 17 ft Casita Spirit Deluxe just prior to getting our current Class B+. After several multi-week and a three and one half month trip that had many days/nights of cold and/or rainy weather, we found that for two adults and one 25 lb Cocker Spaniel, the Casita was (a) too small for extended inside living; and (b) way too uncomfortable for either of us to sit for extended periods. A Casita makes a good weekend RV camping vehicle, but not really a good 24/7/365 residence. If you read the Casita Owners; Forums you'll note references to more living outside of the trailer than inside. That's fine for many, but as fulltimers we used our RV as more or less a movable apartment rather than most nights sitting around a campfire singing camp songs; but that was our style of living, not necessarily others'. We had looked at Casitas many years ago and were good with their construction and ease of use, but never did we actually get in one and sit and use the space as we would as full or long timers. As manufactured, the Casita doesn't have many of the features a higher priced rig might have, like a screen door handle, shock absorbers, battery cutoff switch, and a retaining front to the molded shelf in the wet bath. Little House Customs https://littlehousecustoms.com/ has made a thriving business of providing add ons for Casitas to make them more livable; so you might familiarize yourself with his work if you plan to go with Casita. The best thing about Casitas is their resale. . .we sold ours for exactly what we paid for it new from the factory, but not the $5000 we had put into add ons from MCD Shades and Little House Customs; but we figure that was our cost for a couple of years' use. I'm sure you are familiar with Casitas, but wanted to share our fulltimer experience with ours. We still like living small for extended trips, but we bit the bullet and bought a pre-owned 2012 24 ft Phoenix Cruiser Sprinter (diesel) Class B+. It has one slide and comfortable chairs and a sofa; plus a 6.5 cu. ft refrigerator/freezer and worlds of inside storage. We now have what we sought but missed in the Casita. We have pictures posted on the Class B and/or Class C sections on this forum.
  9. After extensive research and a factory tour, this is the 29 ft rig we would choose if we were going that big. http://www.phoenixusarv.com/2910D.html
  10. I have numbness issues with my hands which make using any wrench in tight spaces difficult, but this saved the day when removing my Atwood plastic plug (I got mine cheaper at Home Depot) https://smile.amazon.com/TEKTON-14138-8-Inch-Shallow-6-Point/dp/B000NPULC4/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1491913804&sr=8-4&keywords=7%2F8+socket
  11. Yup. . .we just rejoined Escapees and began to be active in the Class B & Class C forums wa-a-a-y down at the bottom of the page-just in time to deal with the oh-so-up-to-date format and server change. Since we are in email and Facebook connection with our RV friends; and are active on the Phoenix Cruiser owners forum, can't speak for DW, but I personally don't see the need for the added electro-aggravation and lack of consideration for many of the members. Maybe later. . . . . . . .
  12. This is why we began our RV life with a used (affordable) 30 ft. Airstream Classic (and it didn't have a "cone of death" LOL.
  13. May I suggest taking a look at this manufacturer of well constructed Class B+/Class C motorhomes? http://www.phoenixusarv.com/index.html Perhaps the Model 2551 or 2552 might work for you. We have the 2400, but we have to turn the sofa into a bed every night. . .no biggie for us, but that is us. We have some pics in the Class B section of this forum. We have been RVing for about 20 years, both fulltime and some time, and we are spending our waning RV years in a Phoenix Cruiser (PC). We toured their factory and saw the "not assembly line" approach to building their coaches. . .they are pretty much hand built and can be customized to many of your specifications and staying within the price range of other makes that aren't built in the same manner. We bought pre-owned since we couldn't spring for a new one on our pension based budget; but we knew what went into the building of our 2012 PC. They usually have trade ins in both Phoenix Cruisers as well as other makes; and knowing the staff as we do, we would not hesitate to purchase a pre-owned from them.
  14. You are smart to be doing your research. Remember, most RVs, and especially many travel trailers are built to serve the "2-3 weeks a year vacationers with some holiday weekends" customers. They aren't built to withstand "the 24/7/365 opening and closing of doors, drawers, cabinets which usually involves slamming shut rather than gently closing" lives of fulltimers. We began our fulltime life in a used (read affordable) 30ft Airstream Classic because research showed that about 60% of all Airstreams made since 193? are still in use, either stationary or on the road. That can't be said about most other trailers. they are (were?) build with solid wood cabinets...no particle board. Insulation was adequate for all but the most intense heat and cold; and the latches and catches held up to our opening and closing mentioned above. When health concerns took us to a more user friendly motorhome, research showed us that except for the high end models of the popular manufacturers (read Winnebago, Newell, and Tiffin among others), our best choice for an RV that would hold up to the 24/7/365 way of life was, in our case a 14 year old (read affordable again) Foretravel. Other high end rigs (Bluebird, Country Coach etc.) are just as serviceable for fulltimers but at the time we got such a deal on our 1996 40 ft Foretravel U320 diesel pusher. I've thrown all these manufacturers out to you merely as a caution to understand that just because an RV has good reviews by non-fulltime users and it looks nice doesn't mean that it can be used 24/7/365 without a whole bunch of constant maintenance and upgrades. Just sayin'. . .