Jump to content

Sharing the Fulltime Lifestyle

Living fulltime in an RV.

470 topics in this forum

    • 175 replies
    • 11,299 views
    • 159 replies
    • 16,145 views
    • 118 replies
    • 15,568 views
    • 112 replies
    • 7,046 views
    • 100 replies
    • 6,373 views
  1. fifth vs. mh

    • 96 replies
    • 9,417 views
    • 90 replies
    • 3,396 views
    • 89 replies
    • 7,875 views
  2. Lippert Frames

    • 87 replies
    • 17,506 views
  3. Fulltimer statistics

    • 85 replies
    • 7,182 views
  4. Escapee's FL Mail Service

    • 83 replies
    • 12,802 views
    • 81 replies
    • 3,028 views
  5. Washington State as a F/Ter Domicile

    • 79 replies
    • 10,822 views
    • 79 replies
    • 5,418 views
    • 71 replies
    • 5,168 views
    • 70 replies
    • 14,662 views
    • 69 replies
    • 5,887 views
    • 66 replies
    • 9,662 views
    • 63 replies
    • 2,417 views
    • 62 replies
    • 4,357 views
    • 60 replies
    • 9,793 views
  6. Domicile Pros & Cons

    • 56 replies
    • 4,557 views
    • 56 replies
    • 5,774 views
  7. FULL TIME vs full time

    • 54 replies
    • 3,454 views
    • 53 replies
    • 4,412 views
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • There are professional RV inspectors in some areas and you can usually locate them with an internet search. If you do not find any that way then contact one of the local mobile RV techs to check the RV and for motorized RVs you should take it to a trusted mechanic to check out that part. I would expect to pay between $150 and $300 for a thorough check of a motorhome. It should require several hours and you can expect it to cost as much as the same amount of service time. I suggest that you start the process by reading this article.
    • Shrink fits,   There are a lot of assemblies that are shrink fit, cold part/hot part.     Removing seized fasteners, same principal.      There is induction heaters for installing/ removing bolts, bearings etc.      I agree the week of soaking may have done the trick?     On the garage forum guys buy vices with frozen lead screws and soak them for weeks, even months, nearly all move in the end.       The one thing I notice on a lot of fasteners on trucks, the threads are gaulled upon removal, that is a result of the high torque applied to them.      That makes removing them even more difficult.     Steve 
    • At the request of the person who posted, IT has removed him from our membership. You can see the evidence of that if you choose to look at the first post in this thread. 
    • Little derailment here.... Back in the yacht building days, we would take the end of a propeller drive shaft and freeze it for 24 hours and take the coupler and bake it at 450 for several hours.  Carefully insert frozen prop shaft into the heated coupler and let cool.  Insert set screw/bolt and you have an assembly that you cannot separate with cutting. The dimensions of the exterior shaft and the interior coupler were the exact same size to where they would not slide or slip together.  Heat expands metal, cold contracts.  Even the difference in daytime vs night time temps can work to your advantage if the fasteners have been soaked.
×