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MDT

Medium Duty Trucks (Class 4-6).

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  1. Fuel mileage

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  2. M2 Recall

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  3. Freightliner M2 accesary wanted

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  4. M2-106 Air leak

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  6. Weigh Stations

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    • Few RVers have commercial licenses. Does that make a difference? Linda Sand
    • We traveled in both a Class C and a Class B and I would not own a cassette toilet. Black tank all the way. Although I wish I'd had a macerator on the last one. I would even choose a port-a-pot with a bag in it over a cassette. Yes, I have experience with the port-a-pot, too. In fact, we still own one of those. Linda Sand
    • My portfolio just lost $75,000 in 12 days — here's why I'm not worried at all Excerpt: "A stock market crash, or a dip, can cause even smart investors to panic. Ramit Sethi is the author of a best-selling book on personal finance, and when the stock market dipped, he lost $75,000. He isn't worried, because he knows successful investors play the long game, and that opting out of the stock market is far riskier than opting in. Last week the stock market took the world on a wild ride, and in response, the media went crazy with scary headlines like … Blip or downturn? What the market meltdown means for your money Is it time to sell before we hit bottom? Stock market meltdowns have become frighteningly common The goal of these headlines is to get people to click, and people will, but the average investor is left only with doubt and scary-looking losses. As an author of a New York Times best-selling book on personal finance and someone with a portfolio of investments, I'd like to share this piece of counterintuitive advice: Keep calm and carry on. In other words, don't change a thing! Don't get me wrong. I was greatly affected by the decline. You can see that my portfolio dropped by over $75,000 in just 12 days of this month: Most people who lose $75,000, $2,000, or $500 would freak out, sell their stocks, and say things like "I would just hold cash to be safe" or "See, this is why I don't invest in stocks!" But here are three reasons why I kept my investment portfolio untouched — and why you should stay disciplined, whether your portfolio is worth $500, $50,000, or $500,000." he goes on to cover 1. Keep investing and you'll get investment returns no matter what 2. It's not 'timing' the market, it's time IN the market 3. It's pointless to look at daily trends Lower prices are good as long as you have a long-term goal. If you're young, that means you can pick up more shares of the stocks at a lower price. For people who are older, they would benefit from adjusting their asset allocation to be more conservative so that declines affect them less dramatically. I'd like to encourage you to go from "hot" to "cool" around your money. Instead of feeling "hot" emotions like anxiety or fear, get educated enough to feel "calm" and "confident." I feel calm because I know my money is automatically being invested every month, that staying in the market gives me much better returns than panicking and selling, and I can focus on other parts of my life. Long term investments shouldn't affect your day to day. Whether you lose $500 or $5,000 — or gain $50,000 or $2 million over time — the important thing is to nail down good personal finance habits so that when your portfolio grows in the future you'd exactly know how to react and can stay strong with your investments for years to come." The above are small excerpts from an in-depth and insightful article I completely agree with in Business Insider.  You can read it in full by clicking here: Good advice If you followed the other thread, "Are You Still In?" you saw me do just that. I bought low several times on IPO. and in the six months after on dips to $22.5. I sold near the year's high because I am using that money to buy a new house cash. Then I can take my time selling this 5 acres with new house, workshop, 12X20 finished out plumbed, wired, paneled, insulated and air conditioned portable building. Then I can reinvest the whole amount and next time, take out only enough I have deductions to cover. Oh well, taxes only come with gains. 
    • Heading for moody Texas November 1 hope it dries out soon! In Wisconsin right now and its cold!!!
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