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Travel

Places to travel and things to see.

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  2. Hwy 2

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  3. RV parks

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    • Ok now after reading a little more about the current Goodyears installed and replacing with the Sailuns of the exact same size (235/85R16) I am being told the Sailuns are actually about 1" taller?? I'm not sure my trailer setup will tolerate a taller tire. There is only 2 1/4" gap between each of the three tires (at two spots) as it is now. With a 1" taller tire I will be closing the gap down to potentially 1 1/4" correct? That seems awful close to me?? Should I use the 235/80R16's instead?  My current Goodyear weight capacity is 3,750 per tire.... the Sailun 235/80R16's are still greater than that at 4,080. I did like the 85's more at 4,400    
    • I’m currently stationed in Texas but will be heading to my new duty station in west Florida at the end of May. Due to being in the military I’m not required to register vehicles, get a new drivers license, etc while I’m in that state. I will be in Florida for the next 9 months or so training. My drivers license has my parents old address in California. I think the issue with Progressive was that state I’d be keeping the trailer in(Florida and/or Texas).  I will check out those other companies thanks!
    • Took my initial trip 304 miles combination of 55 and 65 MPH roads truck by itself. Burned around 21 gal on primarily river grade to and from the city and through small town driving.  14 MPG verse 12.5 I am very happy so far..  This week time to hook up and head for home, 950 miles will be the true test. If I can get 11-12 on my return towing it will be as expected and couldn't be happier. 
    • I agree! There is a GPS in the pilot position and an atlas in the copilot position. I will look at what the GPS is wanting us to do and toss the question to the copilot for confirmation. 
    • There are very few dealers who will put anything over 10 years old on their lots and some stop at 5 years. But that has more to do with profit margin after sales commission than on condition or usability. In addition, it is very difficult to find financing for an RV that is 10 or more years old, no matter who made it or the condition of it. That tends to make them harder to sell and lower the prices but it still does not mean that at least some of them are still very usable. We once bought a 5-year-old Mallard travel trailer and we kept if for 7 years and then sold it for about half of what we had paid. It was still in use at least 3 years later when we moved away. While a travel trailer can be worn out the amount of care that they are given plays a major role in the time it takes. The retail prices do fall with increasing age and the price is based mostly on the typical RV that the specific one that you are looking at, which means that when you do find the one owner RV that has been carefully maintained and well cared for, that RV won't bring a lot more than the poorer quality ones and so can be a great bargain. When in constant use most RV appliances have a life of about 10 years, but if only in occasional use they may well last for 30 years or the entire useful life of the RV. Another factor is that each time an RV changes hands there is a better chance that it will not be well cared for as the new owner has a smaller investment in it. That isn't always true but it is most of the time. People who pay less usually care less.   
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